geranium, noun

Origin:
English, South African EnglishShow more Transferred use of general English Geranium a genus of herbaceous plants or undershrubs growing wild in temperate regions (in which sense the word is also used in South African English).
A name commonly given to the pelargonium.
Note:
Used also in British English in this sense.
[1760 W. Shenstone Works & Lett. III. 315An antique vase is introduced with a flower and two or three leaves of the scarlet Geranium.]
1790 W. Paterson Narr. of Four Journeys 7The mountains afforded me many beautiful plants, particularly Xheranthimums, Geraniums, Gladioluses, and many others quite new to me.
1809 G. Valentia Voy. & Trav. I. 29I..could scarcely at first refrain from stopping to observe more closely many..Geraniums, and other plants which I had with care cultivated in England, growing neglected in such immense profusion.
a1827 D. Carmichael in W.J. Hooker Botanical Misc. (1831) II. 19The only individuals of them that are natives of the country, are the Protea, the Geranium, (or rather Pelargonium), [etc.].
1924 D. Fairbridge Gardens of S. Afr. 199January...Cuttings may be put in of Coleus and Geraniums, letting the latter dry off for a few hours before planting in a mixture of sand and leaf-mould.
1976 U. Van der Spuy Wild Flowers of S. Afr. for Garden 105Most gardeners the world over refer to both geraniums and pelargoniums as ‘geraniums’, a term which should be applied to very few of the plants commonly called by this name. Most of the plants called ‘geraniums’..are, in fact, pelargoniums.
1989 Your Gardening Questions Answered (Reader’s Digest Assoc.) 337Geranium, Pelargonium (Geranium). Large genus of easy-to-grow, bushy or trailing plants.
A name commonly given to the pelargonium.
Entry Navigation

Visualise Quotations

Quotation summary

Senses

17601989