DSAE test file

European, noun and adjective

Origin:
EnglishShow more Special senses of general English European (one) from Europe.
obsolescent
Note:
The word changed gradually from the usual English meaning; in some citations, especially early ones, it is difficult to tell which sense is intended. The term ‘white’ has now almost completely displaced ‘European’ in South African English.
A. noun A white person; for a period, the official term used for a white person. Cf. non-European noun.
1696 J. Ovington Voy. to Suratt 293Three and Thirty, Slaves, besides Europeans, are daily imply’d in looking after it (sc. the Company’s garden).
1990 [see larney n. sense 1].
B. adjective Denoting a white person; of, pertaining to, or used by white people. Cf. non-European adjective.
1731 G. Medley tr. of P. Kolben’s Present State of Cape of G.H. II. 335The European women at the Cape suffer but little in Travail...Women born in Europe, and brought to Bed at the Cape, have altogether as happy a Time as the Women born in the Settlements.
1990 [see Musi quot. at sense A].
A white person; for a period, the official term used for a white person.
Denoting a white person; of, pertaining to, or used by white people.

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16961990