dorp, noun

Forms:
Also with initial capital.
Origin:
Dutch
a. A country town or village; sometimes derogatory, denoting a backward or unprogressive place; dorpie. Also attributive, and figurative.
1802 Truter & Somerville in G.M. Theal Rec. of Cape Col. (1899) IV. 404He had been with the well known Cornelis Kok on a journey through the dorp Patania and Litakoe to the Barrolow nation.
1992 E. De Waal in Church Times 13 Mar. 8We stop off at small dorps, towns where there may be no more than two or three streets dominated by a huge, white-painted Dutch Reformed Church.
b. With distinguishing epithet:
||onderdorp [Afrikaans, onder lower], Blikkiesdorp sense 2;
outdorp nonce, a small satellite village.
1970 E. Stuart Informant, PinetownThe children from the onderdorp were a poorly dressed, ill-fed group, yet they seemed cheerful enough.
1914 L.H. Brinkman Breath of Karroo 264The mournful aspect that the little town of Victoria West presented for days after the flood still survives in the memories of the inhabitants...Almost every minister in the vicinity of each outdorp desired to take part in the funeral service.
A country town or village; sometimes derogatory, denoting a backward or unprogressive place; dorpie. Also attributive, and figurative.
Derivatives:
Hence dorpdom noun, the state of being a dorp; dorpenaar noun /ˈdɔːpənɑː/, /ˈdɔrpənɑːr/ [Afrikaans, -enaar suffix denoting ‘an inhabitant of (a place)’], an inhabitant of a country village.
1928 J.S. Franklin This Union (1949) 121It is within the power of the ratepayers to decide and determine whether Bloemfontein is to go back to the humdrum existence of ‘dorpdom’ or..play a big and important part in the development of..this great sub-continent of ours.
1982 J. Krige in Staffrider Vol.5 No.2, 20If you slide your feet like this then you can’t stand on top of one, you dumb dorpenaar, and they all laughed.

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18021992

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