DSAE test file

disa, noun

Origin:
Modern Latin, Latin, GreekShow more Modern Latin, named by Swedish botanist P.J. Bergius in his thesis Descriptiones Plantarum ex Capite Bonae Spei (1767); etymology obscure, perhaps Latin dis rich; or Greek disa goddess; or named for the dísir, female deities in Norse mythology.
a. Any of several species of orchid of the genera Disa and Herschelia of the Orchidaceae, especially the Pride of Table Mountain, D. uniflora. Also attributive.
1795 C.R. Hopson tr. of C.P. Thunberg’s Trav. I. 220Among these the Orchis grandiflora, or Disa uniflora..was conspicuous by its beautiful flowers.
1988 A. Pillans in S. Afr. Panorama Oct. 22The disa was given its name by the Swedish botanist, Pêter Jonas Bergius (1730–1790). He never explained why he chose the name when he established it in his thesis Descriptiones Plantarum ex Capite Bonae Spei.
b. With distinguishing epithet, denoting a particular species of orchid of the genera Disa and Herschelia, as:
blue disa, H. graminifolia;
drip disa [see quotations c1951 and 1983], also called mauve disa, D. longicornis;
red disa, the Pride of Table MountainD. uniflora.
Note:
References to other species such as the cluster disa, early blue disa, green-bearded disa, lilac disa, vlei disa, and yellow disa are found mainly in specialist publications.
1917 R. Marloth Dict. of Common Names of Plants 23D. graminifolia, the Blue Disa.
1992 S. Johnson in Afr. Wildlife Vol.46 No.4, 177Marloth’s most celebrated discovery was that the magnificent red disa (Disa uniflora), widely known as the emblem of the Mountain Club of South Africa and the Western Province Rugby Union, is pollinated by [the butterfly] Meneris.
Any of several species of orchid of the genera Disa and Herschelia of the Orchidaceae, especially the Pride of Table Mountain, D. uniflora. Also attributive.

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17951992