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Cape smoke, noun phrase

Origin:
Dutch, EnglishShow more Etymology unknown; perhaps from Dutch Kaap Cape + smaak taste; or Cape + English smoke, alluding to the spirit’s cloudy colour. Cf. U.S. slang, smoke ‘cheap (home-made) liquor’ (early 1900s).
obs. except in historical contexts
A rough brandy made during the 19th century of either peaches or grapes; Kaapse smaak, see Kaapse sense 3. See also Cape brandy.
[1821 T. Pringle Letter. 12 JuneThe best [wine] produced on the frontier at present I fear could not appear on his board. It is all deeply tainted with the vile Kaap smaak.]
1991 Flying Springbok May 105The rough ‘fire water’ which passed as brandy, also referred to in those days as Cape Smoke, was good enough for soldier, sailor, worker and servant.
A rough brandy made during the 19th century of either peaches or grapes; Kaapse smaak, see Kaapse3.

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18211991