DSAE test file

bush, noun1 and adjective1

Origin:
English, South African DutchShow more English, influenced by South African Dutch bosch and its senses, see bosch.
A. noun
1.
a. noncount. The thick vegetation covering any uncultivated area; bosch sense 1.
1698 [see Bushman sense 1 a].
1991 F.G. Butler Local Habitation 52Interesting things were always being done, such as bush being cleared for new lands, sheep-shearing, harvesting, and above all, dam-building.
b. Attributive and in combinations
bushfire, cf. veldfire (see veld sense 2 b);
bush hat, a military-style cloth hat with a narrow, floppy brim;
bush jacket, a belted cotton jacket, often khaki, usually with buttoned pockets; also called safari jacket sense (a), see safari;
bush knife, a large, heavy hunting-knife;
bush pay historical, a special allowance paid to soldiers on border duty (see Border sense 3 b);
bush soil, (usually in the Eastern Cape) the dark, friable soil found in bush country and valued by gardeners.
1911 Farmer’s Weekly 4 Oct. 126Farmers are beginning to complain of drought, and the number of bush fires that have raged in the vicinity of Grahamstown indicates that the country is getting dry.
1991 E. Prov. Herald 7 Feb. 15 (advt)Bush soil: For better clean quality bush soil phone the oldest name in the game.
2.
a. Plural bushes, or (rarely) unchanged. A forest or thicket; bosch sense 2.
Note:
A sense formerly found in British English but now obsolete.
[1823 G. Barker Journal. 7 Dec.We then sat down to a cold dinner, in a bush, about 120 [persons].]
1991 F.G. Butler Local Habitation 52There was the silhouette of Rhebokberg and the tree-lined course of the Great Fish River, the dam, the poplar bush and the lands.
b. An element in place names, especially in the Eastern Cape, e.g. Assegai Bush, Fish River Bush, Kowie Bush. See also bosch sense 3 b.
3. noncount. Usually the bush: undeveloped, largely uninhabited country; country in its natural state. Also attributive. See also bundu, bushveld sense 2, veld sense 2 a i.
Note:
Used also in Australian English (1790).
1829 C. Rose Four Yrs in Sn Afr. 146When the wife of a Kaffer dies, he becomes unclean, leaves the kraal, and lives in the bush for a certain time.
1994 P. Gird in Sunday Times 18 Sept. 3She wants to come back. She fell in love with the bush.
4. Especially in traditional Xhosa society: in the expression to go to the bush, to take part in the traditional period of initiation during which young black men withdraw from their communities after undergoing circumcision. See also circumcision school (circumcision sense 2).
1976 M. Tholo in C. Hermer Diary of Maria Tholo (1980) 22We saw a big group of youths going to the bush up the road carrying loads of bushes and sticks like they do when they are going to slaughter and use a lot of fire.
1980 E. Joubert Long Journey of Poppie Nongena 41Three of the boys went together to do abakwetha. They go into the bush to do the ritual, and that is why we call it going to the bush for short.
B. adjective derogatory.
1. Inferior; rough-and-ready; uncivilized.
Note:
Not exclusively South African English.
1974 Sunday Express 30 June 20She has stamped out crime to the zing of a flaying sjambok and the rule of her dreaded makgotlas — unofficial tribal-type bush courts.
1988 R.S.A. Policy Review (Bureau of Information) Vol.1 No.1, 46Black educationalists’ fears that differentiated curricula could mean inferior apartheid or bush education.
2. Special collocations bush college, bush university: derogatory, any of several universities founded by the government for exclusive use by blacks, ‘coloureds’, and Indians, in terms of Act 45 of 1959 which made non-racial universities illegal. See also tribal college.
1976 A.P. Brink Mapmakers (1983) 140The ‘black’ universities, where libraries are under strict control and students constantly surveilled by Security Police, and where academic qualifications are often secondary to political convictions, are generally referred to as ‘Bush Colleges’.
1991 Weekly Mail 24 May 2Leaving school to become a teacher of mathematics and science, he returned to his studies..when he enrolled for a BSc at a ‘bush’ university, Turfloop.
3. In the intransitive verbal phrase to go bush, to lose the veneer of civilization by living in the bush or country.
1978 G. Langley in Sunday Times 2 Apr. (Mag. Sect.) 2Memories of earlier days, when he was young and strong, riding the hills bareback, following the cattle as they wandered, going ‘bush’ and sleeping rough like the pioneers of old.
1985 Style Oct. 52The Englishman’s contact with the land has always been uneasy. Some go bats. Some go bush.
The thick vegetation covering any uncultivated area; bosch1.
A forest or thicket; bosch2.
An element in place names, especially in the Eastern Cape, e.g. Assegai Bush, Fish River Bush, Kowie Bush.
undeveloped, largely uninhabited country; country in its natural state. Also attributive.
in the expression to go to the bush, to take part in the traditional period of initiation during which young black men withdraw from their communities after undergoing circumcision.
Inferior; rough-and-ready; uncivilized.
any of several universities founded by the government for exclusive use by blacks, ‘coloureds’, and Indians, in terms of Act 45 of 1959 which made non-racial universities illegal.
In the intransitive verbal phrase to go bush, to lose the veneer of civilization by living in the bush or country.

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18231994