DSAE test file

Cape, noun

Origin:
Elliptical for Cape of Good Hope.
1. The Cape: A name for a. the Cape of Good Hope; b. in historical contexts. the Cape Colony; the Colony, see Colony; c. the (Western) Cape Province; d. the Cape Peninsula; e. Cape Town. In all senses also called Kaap. Also attributive. See also Fairest Cape.
Note:
In 1994 the Cape Province was divided into three new provinces, the Western Cape, Eastern Cape, and Northern Cape.
[1589 in W.S.W. Vaux World Encompassed by Sir Francis Drake (1854) 251From Jaua Maior we sailed for the cape of Good Hope...This Cape is a most stately thing, and the fairest Cape we saw in the whole circumference of the earth, and we passed by it the 18. of June [1580].]
1990 R. Gool Cape Town Coolie 173He had once wanted..to merge himself with the Cape, to belong here in Cape Town.
2. Special Comb.
a. Plants and animals:
Cape ant-eater, see ant-eater sense 1;
Cape ash, the essenhout (sense a), Ekebergia capensis;
Cape beech, the tree Rapanea melanophloeos of the Myrsinaceae; also called boekenhout;
Cape box, the tree Buxus macowanii of the Buxaceae;
Cape buffalo, the buffalo (sense 1), Syncerus caffer;
Cape bulbs, see quotation 1966;
Cape canary, the seed-eating bird Serinus canicollis of the Fringillidae; also called sysie (sense a);
Cape cedar, the Clanwilliam cedar, Widdringtonia cedarbergensis;
Cape chestnut, wild chestnut sense (b), see wild sense a;
Cape cobra, the venomous cobra Naja nivea of the Elapidae; bakkop; yellow cobra, see yellow sense a; see also mfesi, and rinkhals sense 1;
Cape cormorant, the marine bird Phalacrocorax capensis of the Phalacrocoracidae; trek-duiker, see duiker sense 2 b i;
Cape cow obsolete, see quotations;
Cape dikkop, see dikkop sense 1 a i;
Cape dune molerat, see molerat sense 2;
Cape ebony, either of two tree species,

(a). Heywoodia lucens of the Euphorbiaceae;

(b). Euclea pseudebenus of the Ebenaceae;
Cape fox, the mammal Vulpes chama of the Canidae;
Cape francolin, the game bird Francolinus capensis of the Phasianidae;
Cape fur seal, the seal Arctocephalus pusillus of the Otariidae;
Cape gannet, the malgas, Morus capensis; also attributive;
Cape golden mole, see golden mole sense b;
Cape grysbok, see grysbok;
Cape hare, the hare Lepus capensis of the Leporidae; vlakte haas, see vlakte sense 2;
Cape hartebeest, see hartebeest noun sense b;
Cape heath obsolete, a collective name for various species of heath-like plants indigenous to the Cape Peninsula;
Cape hen, the white-chinned petrel Procellaria aequinoctialis of the Procellariidae;
Cape holly, the tree Ilex mitis of the Aquifoliaceae;
Cape honeysuckle, the tecoma, Tecomaria capensis;
Cape horse, a hardy horse bred predominantly from Oriental and English stock, from which two indigenous breeds, the Boerperd and the Basotho pony, were developed;
Cape hunting dog, the wild dog (see wild sense b), Lycaon pictus;
Cape hyacinth, berg lily (see berg sense 1 b ii);
Cape jasmine, also Cape jassamine, Cape jessamine, any of several sweet-scented flowering plants of the genus Gardenia; also called katjiepiering;
Cape laburnum, the plant Crotalaria capensis of the Fabaceae;
Cape lark obsolete, the kalkoentjie (sense 1), Macronyx capensis;
Cape lilac,

(a). the syringa (sense a), Melia azedarach;

(b). the deurmekaarbos (see deurmekaar sense 2), Ehretia rigida;
Cape lion, an extinct subspecies of lion, Panthera leo melanochaites;
Cape lobster, crayfish;
Cape mahogany, either of two tree species,

(a). Natal mahogany sense (a), see Natal sense b;

(b). stinkwood sense a; its wood;
Cape marigold, Namaqualand daisy;
Cape molerat, see molerat sense 2;
Cape mountain zebra, see mountain zebra sense (a) at mountain;
Cape otter (now usually Cape clawless otter), the otter Aonyx capensis of the Mustelidae;
Cape ox obsolete, Afrikander noun sense 4;
Cape parrot, the endangered parrot Poicephalus robustus of the Psittacidae;
Cape partridge, see partridge sense 1 b;
Cape pheasant, see pheasant sense b;
Cape pigeon, the mottled black and white Pintado petrel, Daption capense of the Procellariidae;
Cape pondweed, waterblommetjie sense a;
Cape Riesling, Riesling sense 1;
Cape robin, the common garden bird Cossypha caffra of the Turdidae; Jan Frederik;
Cape saffron,

(a). the plant Sutera atropurpurea of the Scrophulariaceae;

(b). the tree Cassine peragua of the Celastraceae;
Cape sandalwood , see sandalwood ;
Cape sheep obsolete, frequently with qualifying word, large-tailed Cape sheep, fat-tailed sheep, see fat-tailed sense a;
Cape sparrow, the sparrow Passer melanurus; mossie (sense 1 a);
Cape tiger, the tiger (sense 1), Panthera pardus;
Cape trumpet flower, the tecoma, Tecomaria capensis;
Cape vulture, the endangered vulture Gyps coprotheres of the Accipitridae; also called aasvoel (sense a);
Cape wagtail, the commonest and most widely distributed of the southern African wagtails, Motacilla capensis, noted for its lack of fear of humans; also called quickstertje;
Cape walnut,

(a). stinkwood sense a;

(b). boerboon;
Cape wigeon obsolete, the teal Anas capensis of the Anatidae ;
Cape willow ?obsolete, the tree Salix capensis of the Salicaceae .
1989 Your Gardening Questions Answered (Reader’s Digest Assoc.) 333Ekbergia, Ekbergia capensis...Also known as Cape ash.
1977 E. Palmer Field Guide to Trees of Sn Afr. 81Wild Willow, Salix capensis..Cape willow.
b. Products originating from (or manufactured at) the Cape:
Cape aloe obsolete except in historical contexts, a pharmaceutical product obtained by tapping and drying the juice of the plant Aloe ferox;
Cape beer obsolete;
Cape biltong, see bokkem;
Cape diamond, a name used in the grading of diamonds for a stone with a yellowish colour (see also sense 3 below);
Cape dop, see dop noun sense 2 c;
Cape furniture, especially in the phrase old Cape furniture, furniture made during previous centuries, usually of indigenous woods, in a style blending Dutch and English tradition; see also sense 3 below, and Cape Dutch adjectival phrase sense 2 b;
Cape Madeira obsolete except in historical contexts, a sweet dessert wine similar in type to Madeira; see also Cape wine;
Cape ruby, the semi-precious garnet, often found in association with diamonds;
Cape silver, silverware dating from c1730 onwards; also attributive;
Cape wagon historical, a large, loosely-constructed transport wagon, drawn by either horses or oxen;
Cape white, a white diamond.
1798 S.H. Wilcocke tr. of J.S. Stavorinus’s Voy. to E. Indies II. 84The Cape aloe is more transparent, and equal, if not superior, in quality, to those sorts, sold under the denominations of aloe succotrine, and aloe hepatica.
1965 D. Rooke Diamond Jo 87And in Africa the diamonds were waiting for men...They were strewn on the banks of the rivers and hidden in pipes beneath the ground: the glorious Cape whites, the yellows.
3. Elliptical for:
Cape diamond, see sense 2 b above;
Cape furniture (especially in the phrase old Cape), see sense 2 b above;
Cape hides; Cape leather or capeskin, see quotation 1956;
Cape stocks and shares;
Cape wine;
Cape wool.
1884 York Herald (U.K.) 23 Aug. 7Wool Markets...Capes are without improvement.
1987 G. Viney Col. Houses 54The stinkwood and yellowwood cupboard on a stand is Cape, as are the two Cape Louis chairs.
A name for a. the Cape of Good Hope; b.in historical contexts. the Cape Colony; the Colony, see Colony; c. the (Western) Cape Province; d. the Cape Peninsula; e. Cape Town. In all senses also called Kaap. Also attributive.
Heywoodia lucens of the Euphorbiaceae;
Euclea pseudebenus of the Ebenaceae;
the syringa (sense a), Melia azedarach;
the deurmekaarbosdeurmekaar2, Ehretia rigida;
Natal mahogany sense (a), see Natalb;
stinkwooda; its wood;
the plant Sutera atropurpurea of the Scrophulariaceae;
the tree Cassine peragua of the Celastraceae;
, see sandalwood
stinkwooda;
boerboon;
the teal Anas capensis of the Anatidae
the tree Salix capensis of the Salicaceae
Derivatives:
Hence Capian adjective  obsolete, of or pertaining to the Cape; Capeite noun  obsolete [English suffix -ite denoting (one) connected with or belonging to], Kaapenaar sense 1.
1731 G. Medley tr. of P. Kolben’s Present State of Cape of G.H. II. 9The Reader needs not be told, that the Cape — or Capian-Settlement, as it is sometimes call’d, takes its Name from the Cape, which makes a Part of it...In the Year 1712 the Capian-Colony was..considerably extended.
G. MedleyP. Kolben’s Present State of Cape of G.H.9landdrost1