DSAE test file

wild, adjective

Origin:
EnglishShow more English, referring to the similarity between a familiar European species and an unfamiliar African species.
Special collocations.
a. In the names of plants:
wild almond, wild chestnut sense (a), see below;
wild apricot, any of several small trees or shrubs,

(a). any of several species of Dovyalis of the Flacourtiaceae, especially D. caffra; see also Kei apple (Kei sense 1);

(b). any of several species of Diospyros of the Ebenaceae; see also jakkalsbessie;
wild banana, either of two species of plant of the genus Strelitzia, S. alba or S. reginae, bearing stiff flowers of orange, yellow, and purple; also called strelitzia;
wild celery, the blister bush, Peucedanum galbanum;
wild chestnut, either of two indigenous flowering trees with spreading branches and pink or lilac blossom,

(a). Brabejum stellatifolium of the Proteaceae; wild almond;

(b). Calodendrum capense of the Rutaceae;
Cape chestnut, see Cape sense 2 a; the fruit of these trees;
wild fig, wild fig tree [translation of Afrikaans wildevijg, wildevy], any of several species of tree of the genus Ficus;
wild gardenia, kershout sense 2;
wild garlic, the wilde knoflok (see wilde sense a), Tulbaghia alliacea;
wild grape, see as a main entry;
wild kapok [translation of Afrikaans wildekapok], the soft cotton-like hairs encasing the seeds of either of two plants, Asclepias fruticosa of the Asclepiadaceae (also called melkbos sense 1 a i), or Ipomoea albivenia of the Convolvulaceae; cf. kapok sense 1;
wild melon, tsamma;
wild olive, olienhout sense a; also attributive;
wild orange ?obsolete, any of several small trees belonging to the genus Strychnos of the Loganiaceae (especially Strychnos pungens), bearing fruit with edible pulp; see also klapper noun1 sense 1;
wild pear,

(a). the small deciduous tree Dombeya rotundifolia of the Sterculiaceae (cacao family); the wood of this tree; also called wild plum (sense (d), see below);

(b). any of several trees of the Ochnaceae, especially Ochna pulchra;
wild pisang, see pisang sense 2 b;
wild plum, any of several trees bearing plum-like fruits, especially

(a). Harpephyllum caffrum; formerly also called kaffir plum (see kaffir noun sense 2 e); its fruit;

(b). Pappea capensis of the Sapindaceae, valued for the shade and sustenance it offers in arid areas; its fruit;

(c). Bequaertiodendron magalismontanum; also called stamvrug; the fruit of this tree;

(d). the wild pear (sense (a), see above), Dombeya rotundifolia; the fruit of this tree;

(e). the amatungulu, Carissa macrocarpa;

(f). the moretlwa, Grewia flava;
wild pomegranate,

(a). the moisture-loving shrub Burchellia bubalina of the Rubiaceae;

(b). any of several species of Rhigozum of the Bignoniaceae, especially the small twiggy tree R. obovatum;
wild sage [see quotation 1966],

(a). salie sense 1;

(b). the vaalbos (sense 1 a), Tarchonanthus camphoratus;
wild spinach, morogo;
wild watermelon, tsamma;
wild wormwood, the wilde als (see wilde sense a), Artemisia afra.
1731 G. Medley tr. of P. Kolben’s Present State of Cape of G.H. I. 202One Sort of Fruit they eat is call’d the Wild or the African Almond. They boil those Almonds twice or thrice in fresh Water, and then lay them in the Sun to dry.
1822, 1987wild wormwood: [see wilde als wilde sense 1].
b. In the names of animals:
wild ass obsolete [perhaps translation of South African Dutch wilde ezel], the quagga (sense 1 a i), Equus quagga;
wild cat, any of several small predatory felines of the Felidae, especially Felis lybica; see also tiger-cat;
wild dog, the mammal Lycaon pictus of the Canidae; Cape hunting dog, see Cape sense 2 a;
wild horse obsolete [probably translation of South African Dutch wildepaard, see wilde sense b], any of several species of zebra, especially the mountain zebra (sense (a) see mountain), Equus zebra zebra.
[1688wild ass: G. Tachard Voy. to Siam II. 65As for the Asses, they are of all colours, they have a long blew list on the back that reaches from head to tail, and the rest of the body like the horse, full of pretty broad streaks, blew, yellow, green, black and white, all very lively.]
1841 B. Shaw Memorials 316The zebra is beautifully striped with dark bands on every part of its body except the legs, which are white, and is usually seen on the extensive plains. Very similar in appearance are the wild horse and the quagga.
any of several species of Dovyalis of the Flacourtiaceae, especially D. caffra; see also Kei appleKei1;
any of several species of Diospyros of the Ebenaceae; see also jakkalsbessie;
Brabejum stellatifolium of the Proteaceae; wild almond;
Calodendrum capense of the Rutaceae;
the small deciduous tree Dombeya rotundifolia of the Sterculiaceae (cacao family); the wood of this tree; also called wild plum (sense (d), see below);
any of several trees of the Ochnaceae, especially Ochna pulchra;
Harpephyllum caffrum; formerly also called kaffir plumkaffirnoun2 e; its fruit;
Pappea capensis of the Sapindaceae, valued for the shade and sustenance it offers in arid areas; its fruit;
Bequaertiodendron magalismontanum; also called stamvrug; the fruit of this tree;
the wild pear (sense (a), see above), Dombeya rotundifolia; the fruit of this tree;
the amatungulu, Carissa macrocarpa;
the moretlwa, Grewia flava;
the moisture-loving shrub Burchellia bubalina of the Rubiaceae;
any of several species of Rhigozum of the Bignoniaceae, especially the small twiggy tree R. obovatum;
salie1;
the vaalbos (sense 1 a), Tarchonanthus camphoratus;