DSAE test file

vlakte, noun

Forms:
Formerly also vlaakte, vlackte.
Plurals:
vlaktes, formerly vlakten or vlaktens.
Origin:
Dutch
1.
a. An open plain; an extent of flat country; vlaat. Also attributive.
1786 G. Forster tr. of A. Sparrman’s Voy. to Cape of G.H. II. 222The vlaksteen-bok was the name given at Agter Bruntjes-hoogte to animals (probably of the gazel kind) two feet in height, which used, in some sort, to herd together on the vlaktens, or plains.
1985 Fair Lady 3 Apr. 139Taking of cuttings or collecting of seed in the wild or in public gardens is strictly prohibited and even in the vlaktes of Namaqualand you are not alone — there’s a man from Flora and Fauna behind every kokerboom.
b. In the phr. ver verlate vlaktes /ˌfɛːr fərˌlɑːtə ˈflaktəs/ [Afrikaans, ver far, verlate deserted], ‘the far, deserted plains’, a phrase from Die Stem van Suid-Afrika (see Stem). Usually used ironically.
1988 H. Prendini in Style June 102The cuisine of the Trekkers, with its roots in the ver verlate vlaktes and the kreun van ossewa.
1989 T. Botha in Style June 108A love story about the long open road, putting foot, fly-bitten caffies, ver verlate vlaktes.
2. combinations Especially as an element in the names of animals:
vlaksteenbok, vlaktebok, or vlakte steenbok obsolete /-bɔk/, /-stɪənbɔk/ [see steenbok], bleekbok;
vlakte haas /-hɑːs/, also vlakhaas [Afrikaans haas hare], the Cape hare (see Cape sense 2 a), Lepus capensis;
vlakte vark, see vlakvark;
vlakte veld /-felt/ [see veld], plains country.
1786vlaksteenbok: [see sense 1].
1972 Daily Dispatch Jan.Grazing consists of a third berg veld and two thirds vlakte veld.
An open plain; an extent of flat country; vlaat. Also attributive.
‘the far, deserted plains’, a phrase from Die Stem van Suid-AfrikaStem. Usually used ironically.

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17861989