DSAE test file

trek, noun

Forms:
track, treckShow more Formerly also track, treck, trekk.
Plurals:
treks, occasionally trekke /ˈtrekkə/.
Origin:
Dutch, English, Afrikaans, Show more Dutch, the basic sense being ‘an act of pulling’; in most cases the transfer of sense occurred not in English, but in Dutch or Afrikaans, from which languages the new senses were assimilated into English.
1. obsolete. The team of oxen pulling a wagon.
1833 [see quot. at trek ox (sense 12 a below)].
1838 J.E. Alexander Exped. into Int. II. 215Stick to the trek (or line of pack oxen) and the trek will stick to you.
2. in historical contexts. In the phrase on the trek, on trek, in the process of travelling or migrating by wagon; on the road.
1846 J.M. Bowker Speeches & Sel. (1864) 222Here we are on trek.
1951 J. Sachs in B. Sachs Herman Charles Bosman (1971) 142There is all of South Africa in that little book..; its ox-waggons on trek, its witch-doctors, [etc.].
3. A leg of a journey; in historical contexts, the distance travelled by ox-wagon between halts (or ‘outspans’). Cf. skof noun2 sense 1.
1849 E.D.H.E. Napier Excursions in Sn Afr. II. 1First day’s ‘trek’ in Lower Albany. [Note] A Dutch term, generally pronounced ‘track,’ meaning a journey.
1964 V. Pohl Dawn & After 63We had about two treks before us and..we had nothing whatever to eat.
4. A relocation or exodus: a. in historical contexts. The relocation of a large group of people from one area to another, the move usually being made by ox-wagon, and being prompted by political discontent or economic hardship. See also Dorsland Trek (Dorsland); Great Trek. b. Latterly, any relocation, including a temporary move, as for the purpose of working for some months in a distant town. Also attributive.
1852 M.B. Hudson S. Afr. Frontier Life 3The time for such a trek was approaching us fast.
1992 C.M. Knox tr. of E. Van Heerden’s Mad Dog 5Trek groups rested at the side of the road.
5. A journey or trip: a. Usually in historical contexts, a long trip by ox-wagon. b. Any journey, especially a long or arduous one, or one involving travel in the wilds; journeying.
1856 R.E.E. Wilmot Diary (1984) 36Our host being on the eve of a trek we soon took our departure.
1993 A. Putter in Weekly Mail & Guardian 22 Oct. 46Discussion at last year’s Grahamstown Festival about the South African National Gallery’s small contribution to the visual component of the annual cultural trek.
6. Obsolete except in historical contexts A group of travellers; an expedition party; a wagon train, including the travellers, their goods and livestock, and their wagons and draught animals (usually oxen). Cf. trekkie.
a1867 C.J. Andersson Notes of Trav. (1875) 87We were treacherously attacked by overwhelming numbers, just as the ‘trek’ had got into a narrow part of the road.
1976 A.P. Brink Instant in Wind 25Perhaps we’ll find a farmhouse or a trek on the way.
7. colloquial. Goods and chattels; possessions.
a1867 C.J. Andersson Notes of Trav. (1875) 273The Totties (Hottentots) had just left the mountain with their ‘treck’, with a view of coming here.
1984 Informant, N. TvlI was at the new flat waiting for Joy’s trek to arrive.
8. figurative. Hard work, a ‘long haul’; mental or spiritual endeavour.
1882 C. Du Val With Show through Sn Afr. I. 66She is a very big woman; in fact, it is a good ‘trekk’ to go fairly round her, and I fancy she is well able to hold her own against most people.
1987 Weekly Mail 22 May 23An unsettling trek through the sense of unbelonging.
9. A migration of animals. Also attributive. See also sense 12 b below.
1902 C.J. Cornish Naturalist on Thames 67The first [birds] to begin the ‘trek’ down the river are the early broods of water-wagtails.
1990 Weekend Post 30 June (Leisure) 4Natal-type sardines are found in the Cape East Coast water — until they begin their unusual trek.
10. Of fishing: (a haul of fish caught by) the act of hauling in from the shore a trek net which has been cast in the sea. See also sense 12 c below.
1930 C.L. Biden Sea-Angling Fishes 274The first net brought out 90,000 bamboo-fish! The man responsible for that ‘trek’ deserved to be knighted.
1973 Cape Times 13 Jan. (Weekend Mag.) 2 (caption)Last trek of the day.
11. in historical contexts. The Trek: Great Trek sense 1. Also attributive.
1941 C.W. De Kiewiet Hist. of S. Afr. 182Average exports..in the five years following the Trek had soared.
1987 S. Friedman in Weekly Mail 10 July 12This suggests that the Trek celebrations will have something in common with other Nat-CP battles.
12. Special Combinations.
a. Combinations related to ox wagons and to the oxen which pull them (see sense 1):
trek cattle, draught cattle;
trek chain, trektou sense b;
trek gear or trekgoed /-xut/ [Afrikaans goed goods, things], the equipment (such as yokes and chains) used in harnessing draught animals for wagon travel;
trekos /-ɔs/ [Afrikaans, os ox], or trek ox, (a) a draught ox; (b) figurative, tough meat; also attributive;
trek wagon, an ox wagon; a large, sturdily-built covered wagon used for long journeys.
a1867 C.J. Andersson Notes of Trav. (1875) I was enabled..to collect the scattered trek-cattle, &c., which were now inspanned.
1988 J. Boekkooi in Weekend Argus 3 Sept. 5They don’t build trek-wagons like they used to.
b. Combinations related to travel or to the nomadic or migratory movements of people or animals:
trek boer /- bʊə/, /- bur/, plural trek boers, and (formerly) trek boeren, [Afrikaans, boer farmer] historical, (a) a nomadic farmer, (b) Voortrekker noun sense 1; also attributive;
trekbok /-bɔk/ [Afrikaans bok antelope] or partial translation of trekbuck, a springbok which is part of a large migrating herd; (usually in plural form trekbokken) a collective term for the herd or the migration; see also springbok sense 1 a; cf. houbok;
trek farmer, trek boer sense (a) (see above);
trek fever or trekgees /-xɪəs/, earlier trekgeest [Afrikaans, gees (Dutch geest) spirit], restlessness, wanderlust, a longing for open spaces and the outdoor life;
trekpad /-pat/ [Afrikaans, pad path, roadway], an established route used by people trekking by wagon;
trek pass [English pass note of authorization], in rural areas, a written document given to an employee on dismissal or departure, entitling him or her to seek other employment;
trek-path, (a) a rural servitude; the right to herd animals across privately-owned land en route from one grazing area to another; also attributive; (b) an established animal track;
trek-weary adjective.
1835 A. Steedman Wanderings II. 53We met a Trek Boor, with his cattle.
1939 M. Rorke Melina Rorke 100Thinking it too dangerous to risk a solitary crossing with trek-weary oxen, he had decided to turn back.
c. Combinations related to fishing (see sense 10):
trek boat, a boat used in trek fishing (see below);
trek fisherman, one who fishes using a trek net (see below); trekker sense 2;
trek fishing verbal noun, the act or practice of fishing with a trek net; also attributive; trekking verbal noun sense 3;
trek net, a seine net: a large fishing net, weighted at one end and fitted with floats on the other so that it hangs vertically in the water, usually dropped from a boat and hauled in from the shore; also attributive; hence trek netter, trek fisherman (see above).
1985 S.-Easter Oct.Nov. 23 (advt)Dine in an antique Trek Boat.
1993 Sn Argus 12 Aug. 4I would like to reply to Mr Petty’s letter, which accuses me of being..unfairly biased against the trek netters.
d. Special Combinations related to the underlying sense of ‘trek’ in Du. and Afk. (a tug, a pulling action):
treksaw, a two-handled cross-cut saw, operated by two people alternately pushing and pulling.
1972 Daily Dispatch 4 Mar. 18 (advt)Trek Saws; Jacks; [etc.].
1973 E. Prov. Herald 28 May 13A large hole in the ground under the log and a double-handled treksaw pushed and pulled by two men, one down in the hole and the other above.
The team of oxen pulling a wagon.
in the process of travelling or migrating by wagon; on the road.
A leg of a journey; in historical contexts, the distance travelled by ox-wagon between halts (or ‘outspans’).
A group of travellers; an expedition party; a wagon train, including the travellers, their goods and livestock, and their wagons and draught animals (usually oxen).
Goods and chattels; possessions.
Hard work, a ‘long haul’; mental or spiritual endeavour.
A migration of animals. Also attributive.
(a haul of fish caught by) the act of hauling in from the shore a trek net which has been cast in the sea.
The Trek: Great Trek1. Also attributive.