DSAE test file

stinkwood, noun

Origin:
South African Dutch, DutchShow more Translation of South African Dutch stinkhout, from Dutch stink smell(ing) + hout wood; see quotation 1731.
a. The protected indigenous tree Ocotea bullata of the Lauraceae, prized for its timber (in full stinkwood tree); the finely-grained, dark, heavy wood of this tree; African oak, see African adjective1 sense 1 b i; Cape mahogany sense (b), also Cape walnut sense (a), see Cape sense 2 a; stinkhout sense a; stinking wood. Also attributive.
Note:
A prized wood in furniture, particularly when used in combination with yellowwood.
1731 G. Medley tr. of P. Kolben’s Present State of Cape of G.H. II. 260The Stink-Wood Tree grows to the Size of an Oak. The leaves are of the Breadth of Three fingers. ’Tis call’d Stink-Wood, because it has a filthy Scent. While it is under the Tool, it sends out so nauseous a Stench, that the Workman can hardly endure it. But, after some Time, the Stench goes quite off.
1991 S. Welz in Light Yrs Feb. 11A Cape stinkwood and beefwood armoire, dating from the second half of the 18th century.
b. With distinguishing epithet:
bastard stinkwood [see Baster adjective], the protected tree Ocotea kenyensis of the Lauraceae, found in the northern and eastern regions of the country;
black stinkwood, Ocotea bullata (see sense a above);
Camdeboo stinkwood /ˈkæmdəˌbuː -/ [named for a region between Graaff-Reinet and Aberdeen, in the Karoo; Khoikhoi kam green + deboo unknown, perhaps ‘pool in river’ or ‘hollow’], the tree Celtis africana of the Ulmaceae; its wood; Camdeboo; Camdeboo stinkhout, see stinkhout sense b; wit stinkhout, see stinkhout sense b;
cannibal stinkwood obsolete [see quotation 1913], Camdeboo stinkwood (see above);
red stinkwood, the tree Prunus africana of the Rosaceae;
white stinkwood, Camdeboo stinkwood (see above). Also attributive.
1983 K.C. Palgrave Trees of Sn Afr. 176Ocotea kenyensis...Bastard stinkwood.
1993 Weekend Argus 14 Aug. 7White Stinkwood, The indigenous white stinkwood (Celtis africana) is a 12m high, spreading shade tree.
The protected indigenous tree Ocotea bullata of the Lauraceae, prized for its timber (in full stinkwood tree); the finely-grained, dark, heavy wood of this tree; African oak, see Africanadjective1 b i; Cape mahogany sense (b), also Cape walnut sense (a), see Cape2 a; stinkhouta; stinking wood. Also attributive.

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17311993