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Dutch, noun and adjective

Origin:
EnglishShow more Special senses of English Dutch of or originating from Holland.
A. noun
1. in historical contexts. The Dutch (plural): The white Dutch-speaking inhabitants of Cape Town, of the Cape Colony, and later of Natal, the Orange Free State, and the Transvaal; the African Dutch sense (b), see African adjective1 (sense 1 b ii). Cf. Cape Dutch noun phrase sense 1, South African Dutch noun phrase sense 2.
1685 J. Tyrell in R. Raven-Hart Cape G.H. 1652–1702 (1971) II. 255The duch was Very Sivill in thayer expression in promising to supply us with any thing that thayer place did afford.
1940 J. Buchan Memory Hold-the-Door 109The hope of breaking the racial barriers between town and country was always very dear to Milner’s heart. He wanted to see the Dutch share in the urban industries, and men of British stock farming beside the Boers of the veld.
2.
a. in historical contexts. The form of Dutch spoken by the early colonists at the Cape and their descendants, which gradually developed into a distinct language (see South African Dutch noun phrase sense 1). Cf. Cape Dutch noun phrase sense 2. b. A derogatory name for the Afrikaans language. Also attributive.
1731 G. Medley tr. of P. Kolben’s Present State of Cape of G.H. I. 26The People far up the Country, on the Appearance of Strangers, are us’d to say in Dutch, wat Volk, i.e. What People?
1987 C. Hope Hottentot Room 51‘That’s right. Mock my accent. I simply cannot get my tongue around those Dutch words,’ said English Rose.
c. With qualifying word: African Dutch (sense (a), African adjective1 sense 1 b ii), High Dutch.
B. adjective
1. Of or pertaining to Dutch-speaking (and later Afrikaans-speaking) South Africans; South African Dutch adjectival phrase. See also Afrikaner adjective, Cape Dutch adjectival phrase sense 1.
1697 W. Dampier in R. Raven-Hart Cape G.H. 1652–1702 (1971) II. 381At about 2 or 300 paces distance from thence, on the West side of the Fort, there is a small Dutch Town, in which I told about 50 or 60 Houses.
1980 E. Prov. Herald 31 July 18When we spoke earlier you mentioned the process of a Dutch family becoming an Afrikaner family. What is that process?
2. Special collocations
Dutch Church, the Dutch Reformed Church (see note at Dutch Reformed);
Dutch drops, harlemensis;
Dutch medicine, Dutch remedy, old Dutch medicine, a patent household medicine, widely used especially in country districts (for examples of such remedies see doepa sense 2 a, duiwelsdrek, dulsies, groene amara, harlemensis, lewensessens, patat salf (patat sense b), and rooilaventel); see also boereraat, druppels;
Dutch Republic in historical contexts, Boer Republic.
1903 E.F. Knight S. Afr. after War 55When one of these little agricultural townships first springs up the Dutch Church forms the nucleus of it.
1962 F.C. Metrowich Scotty Smith 16As long as Scotty confined his activities to the two Dutch Republics, the Cape authorities..did not interfere with his movements.
The white Dutch-speaking inhabitants of Cape Town, of the Cape Colony, and later of Natal, the Orange Free State, and the Transvaal; the African Dutch sense (b), see Africanadjective (sense 1 b ii).
The form of Dutch spoken by the early colonists at the Cape and their descendants, which gradually developed into a distinct language (see South African Dutchnoun phrase1).
A derogatory name for the Afrikaans language. Also attributive.
African Dutch (sense (a), Africanadjective1 b ii), High Dutch.
Of or pertaining to Dutch-speaking (and later Afrikaans-speaking) South Africans; South African Dutchadjectival phrase.

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